How to manage your constipation, comfortably.

How to manage your constipation, comfortably.

Some  guidance on whether you are actually constipated, how you can manage your constipation and common causes of constipation. Here is some advice on how to better manage your constipation comfortably.

Getting to the bottom of the problem.

Natural Beauty Care has some guidance on whether you are actually constipated and common causes for constipation.

How do you feel?

You are considered to be ‘clinically’ constipated if you are having a bowel movement less than three times per week. Your stools may be hard, dry, small in size and difficult to pass. You may find it painful to pass a stool and are straining in order to do so. Or you may experience bloating and the uncomfortable sensation of a full bowel. Then again, you may be suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrom (IBS) and fluctuate from constipation to diarrhoea. Please do consult with your doctor about your condition.

Are you actually constipated?

If you’re reading this, you probably are, but bear with us. If you are only having a bowel movement less than three times per week, that’s a clear indication that you are constipated. Your stools are typically hard, dry, small in size, and difficult to eliminate. Some people find it painful to have a bowel movement and often experience straining, bloating and the uncomfortable sensation of a full bowel.

Not going every day?

That’s okay. It’s normal. Take Jack and Jill as examples of perfectly healthy people with what is considered to be normal bowel motion. Jack may do his business three times each day. Jill may only go three times a week. It’s personal. There is no rule about going for a poop once a day as being the usual habit.

Don’t worry too much.

Constipation is a symptom, not a disease. Almost everyone experiences constipation at some point in their life. The main cause poor diet and that’s easy to fix generally by increasing your intake of water and fibre in fruit and vegetables, high fibre cereals, supplements and some health drinks. Often as not, most constipation is temporary and not serious.

Common causes of constipation.

There are many things that can cause constipation, most of which you can address if you understand the common causes of constipation which are;

  • not enough fibre in the diet
  • not drinking enough water
  • lack of physical activity (especially in the elderly)
  • medications
  • milk
  • irritable bowel syndrome
  • changes in life or routine such as pregnancy, aging, and travel
  • abuse of laxatives
  • ignoring the urge to have a bowel movement
  • dehydration
  • specific diseases or conditions, such as stroke (most common)
  • problems with the colon and rectum
  • problems with intestinal function (chronic idiopathic constipation) Source (National Digestive Diseases Clearing House)
  • and a new line of thinking links excess mucus to sore stomachs– and even eczema.

Managing your constipation.

There are easy, practical ways to help ease the discomfort of your constipation.

  • Reduce refined foods in your diet e.g. white bread, cakes and sugar.
  • Drink plenty of water to counteract constipation.
  • Eating prunes or drink plum juice daily for its high levels of soluble fibre.
  • Exercise regularly to improve digestion and reduce stress.
  • Aim for a regular bowel habit. The best time is usually the first hour after breakfast. Take your time and sit for at least 10 minutes, regardless of whether you manage to pass a stool. Don’t strain.
  • Make your own juice using raw fruits and vegetables. Click here to visit Juice Extractor Guide, a site dedicated to the benefits of having a juice extractor so that when you buy you make the right decision.

On the subject of water…

  • Drinking more is one of the simpliest ways to ‘self-help. Consider that if you are already constipated and then increase your fibre and do not increase your water consumption you can make things worse.
  • Use water to your advantage to help ‘flush’ your system and help soften your stool. If you are taking a fibre tablet like Aloe Ferox Fabulous Fibre, generally take 1 glass of water per fibre tablet.
  • Drink 8 to 10 glasses of water a day to help flush your system. Hot beverages, such as coffee, tea or hot water may stimulate bowel movements. Many people find relief taking citrus drinks like orange juice or lemon in water.

Are you alone?

Not at all. Constipation is thought to affect a quarter of the population at some time and is more common in the elderly.

When constipation is serious.

There are sometimes complications such as; haemorrhoids, caused by straining to have a bowel movement or anal fissures, tears in the skin around the anus, caused when hard stool stretches the sphincter muscle. As a result, rectal bleeding may occur, appearing as bright red streaks on the surface of the stool. Treatment for hemorrhoids may include warm tub baths, ice packs, and application of a special cream to the affected area. Treatment for anal fissures may include time to allow it to heal naturally if minor, stretching the sphincter muscle or surgically removing the tissue or skin in the affected area.

Do speak to your GP, please.

Changes in bowel motion can signal more serious conditions. If you an ongoing problem or any concerns you must consult with your GP.

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Some  guidance on whether you are actually constipated, how you can manage your constipation and common causes of constipation. Here is some advice on how to better manage your constipation comfortably.

Getting to the bottom of the problem.

Natural Beauty Care has some guidance on whether you are actually constipated and common causes for constipation.

How do you feel?

You are considered to be ‘clinically’ constipated if you are having a bowel movement less than three times per week. Your stools may be hard, dry, small in size and difficult to pass. You may find it painful to pass a stool and are straining in order to do so. Or you may experience bloating and the uncomfortable sensation of a full bowel. Then again, you may be suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrom (IBS) and fluctuate from constipation to diarrhoea. Please do consult with your doctor about your condition.

Are you actually constipated?

If you’re reading this, you probably are, but bear with us. If you are only having a bowel movement less than three times per week, that’s a clear indication that you are constipated. Your stools are typically hard, dry, small in size, and difficult to eliminate. Some people find it painful to have a bowel movement and often experience straining, bloating and the uncomfortable sensation of a full bowel.

Not going every day?

That’s okay. It’s normal. Take Jack and Jill as examples of perfectly healthy people with what is considered to be normal bowel motion. Jack may do his business three times each day. Jill may only go three times a week. It’s personal. There is no rule about going for a poop once a day as being the usual habit.

Don’t worry too much.

Constipation is a symptom, not a disease. Almost everyone experiences constipation at some point in their life. The main cause poor diet and that’s easy to fix generally by increasing your intake of water and fibre in fruit and vegetables, high fibre cereals, supplements and some health drinks. Often as not, most constipation is temporary and not serious.

Common causes of constipation.

  • not enough fibre in the diet
  • lack of physical activity (especially in the elderly)
  • medications
  • milk
  • irritable bowel syndrome
  • changes in life or routine such as pregnancy, aging, and travel
  • abuse of laxatives
  • ignoring the urge to have a bowel movement
  • dehydration
  • specific diseases or conditions, such as stroke (most common)
  • problems with the colon and rectum
  • problems with intestinal function (chronic idiopathic constipation) Source (National Digestive Diseases Clearing House)
  • and a new line of thinking links excess mucus to sore stomachs– and even eczema.

Managing your constipation.

There are easy, practical ways to help ease your discomfort.

  • Reduce refined foods in your diet e.g. white bread, cakes and sugar.
  • Drink plenty of water to counteract constipation.
  • Eating prunes or drink plum juice daily for its high levels of soluble fibre.
  • Exercise regularly to improve digestion and reduce stress.
  • Aim for a regular bowel habit. The best time is usually the first hour after breakfast. Take your time and sit for at least 10 minutes, regardless of whether you manage to pass a stool. Don’t strain.
  • Make your own juice using raw fruits and vegetables. Click here to visit Juice Extractor Guide, a site dedicated to the benefits of having a juice extractor so that when you buy you make the right decision.

On the subject of water…

  • Drinking more is one of the simpliest ways to ‘self-help. Consider that if you are already constipated and then increase your fibre and do not increase your water consumption you can make things worse.
  • Use water to your advantage to help ‘flush’ your system and help soften your stool. If you are taking a fibre tablet like Aloe Ferox Fabulous Fibre, generally take 1 glass of water per fibre tablet.
  • Drink 8 to 10 glasses of water a day to help flush your system. Hot beverages, such as coffee, tea or hot water may stimulate bowel movements. Many people find relief taking citrus drinks like orange juice or lemon in water.

Are you alone?

Not at all. Constipation is thought to affect a quarter of the population at some time and is more common in the elderly.

When constipation is serious.

There are sometimes complications such as; haemorrhoids, caused by straining to have a bowel movement or anal fissures, tears in the skin around the anus, caused when hard stool stretches the sphincter muscle. As a result, rectal bleeding may occur, appearing as bright red streaks on the surface of the stool. Treatment for hemorrhoids may include warm tub baths, ice packs, and application of a special cream to the affected area. Treatment for anal fissures may include time to allow it to heal naturally if minor, stretching the sphincter muscle or surgically removing the tissue or skin in the affected area.

Do speak to your GP, please.

Changes in bowel motion can signal more serious conditions. If you an ongoing problem or any concerns you must consult with your GP.

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